141: Dog Prayers and Showmanship

Doggie spent the night in our room because it rained heavily last night. The rains came around 1AM, accompanied by heavy thunder and wind. I debated whether to bring Doggie up and I decided it was too cruel to let her get drenched overnight. A good thing, too, because when I felt her as she came in her fur was a little damp.

She paced around the room a bit. “Bed, Doggie, bed!” I said to her. And she curled up in her rug. She was quiet the whole night. When I woke up at six this morning, she was sprawled on the floor, belly up and legs spread in utmost dog comfort.

Funny thing is: she didn’t demand for her morning walk when I let her out of the house. She went straight to her cage. Emily told me she was quiet the whole day and didn’t bother her at all. “She must be praying a silent novena for rain again,” Emily guessed.

And true enough, as I write this, the rains have started falling. Not too heavy, not yet. But if it gets any stronger, looks like Doggie might get her wish.

We gave our Mindanao Open Data Archive presentation this afternoon. B–, P–, and I mapped out a rough outline of what we would do and we sort of just took it from there. We had a good audience covering almost all sectors of the university. I was particularly gratified when a lady from the Grade School unit stood up to compliment us and told us this was precisely the tool to help their students conduct their research.

And here’s a bit for showmanship. I prepared survey forms to capture the audience’s thoughts on the project. We collected them after they had filled them up, then I ran them through SDAPS. I returned to my spiel for a bit, and then when I saw the processing was done, I brought up the report that summarized all their opinions. Twenty-nine survey sheets processed in under three minutes, followed by an immediate report. The audience applauded and there were not a few oohs and aahs.

It looks like I might have more clients for this type of implementation. The research really paid off.

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Dom Cimafranca

Teacher, writer, project manager, and all-around nice guy.